Frasi di Gaio Svetonio Tranquillo

Gaio Svetonio Tranquillo photo
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Gaio Svetonio Tranquillo

Data di nascita: 70 d.C.
Data di morte: 126
Altri nomi: Gaius Tranquillus Suetonius, Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus

Gaio Svetonio Tranquillo, chiamato talvolta Suetonio , è stato uno scrittore romano dell'età imperiale, fondamentale esponente del genere della biografia. Fu un erudito, vista la grande mole di opere dallo stesso composte negli ambiti più svariati , amante della vita ritirata onde potersi dedicare agli studi che più amò. Fu figura di antiquario, studioso enciclopedico, con grande interesse per le antichità e la cultura romana, accostabile a Marco Terenzio Varrone per le caratteristiche della produzione.

Frasi Gaio Svetonio Tranquillo

„Caesar overtook his advanced guard at the river Rubicon, which formed the frontier between Gaul and Italy. Well aware how critical a decision confronted him, he turned to his staff, remarking: "We may still draw back but, once across that little bridge, we shall have to fight it out."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Consecutusque cohortis ad Rubiconem flumen, qui provinciae eius finis erat, paulum constitit, ac reputans quantum moliretur, conversus ad proximos: "Etiam nunc," inquit, "regredi possumus; quod si ponticulum transierimus, omnia armis agenda erunt."
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Julius Caesar, Ch. 31

„The method of execution he preferred was to inflict numerous small wounds; and his familiar order: "Make him feel that he is dying!" soon became proverbial.“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Non temere in quemquam nisi crebris et minutis ictibus animadverti passus est, perpetuo notoque iam praecepto: "Ita feri ut se mori sentiat."
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Gaius Caligula, Ch. 30

„One evening at dinner, realizing that he had done nobody any favour throughout the entire day, he spoke these memorable words: "My friends, I have wasted a day."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Atque etiam recordatus quondam super cenam, quod nihil cuiquam toto die praestitisset, memorabilem illam meritoque laudatam vocem edidit: "Amici, diem perdidi."
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Titus, Ch. 8

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„A remarkably modest statement of his is recorded in the Proceedings of the Senate: "If So-and-so challenges me, I shall lay before you a careful account of what I have said and done; if he should continue, I shall reciprocate his dislike of me."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Exstat et sermo eius in senatu percivilis: "Siquidem locutus aliter fuerit, dabo operam ut rationem factorum meorum dictorumque reddam; si perseveraverit, in vicem eum odero."
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Tiberius, Ch. 28

„Aware that the city was architecturally unworthy of her position as capital of the Roman Empire, besides being vulnerable to fire and river floods, Augustus so improved her appearance that he could justifiably boast: "I found Rome built of bricks; I leave her clothed in marble."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Urbem neque pro maiestate imperii ornatam et inundationibus incendiisque obnoxiam excoluit adeo, ut iure sit gloriatus marmoream se relinquere, quam latericiam accepisset.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Augustus, Ch. 28

„When [his son] Drusus died Tiberius was not greatly concerned, and went back to his usual business almost as soon as the funeral ended, cutting short the period of official mourning; in fact, when a Trojan delegation arrived with condolences somewhat belatedly, Tiberius grinned, having apparently got over his loss, and replied: "May I condole with you, in return, on the death of your eminent fellow-citizen Hector?"“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Itaque ne mortuo quidem perinde adfectus est, sed tantum non statim a funere ad negotiorum consuetudinem rediit iustitio longiore inhibito. Quin et Iliensium legatis paulo serius consolantibus, quasi obliterata iam doloris memoria, irridens se quoque respondit vicem eorum dolere, quod egregium civem Hectorem amisissent.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Tiberius, Ch. 52

„Again, during a sacrifice, the augur Spurinna warned Caesar that the danger threatening him would not come later than the Ides of March.“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Et immolantem haruspex Spurinna monuit, caveret periculum, quod non ultra Martias Idus proferretur.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Julius Caesar, Ch. 81

„Dead! And so great an artist!“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Suetonius represents this as Nero's exclamation when he had resolved to kill himself, but not as his last words.
Originale: (la) Qualis artifex pereo!
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Nero, Ch. 49

„Once a woman declared that she was desperately in love with him, and he took her to bed with him. "How shall I enter that item in your expense ledger?" asked his accountant later, on learning that she had got 4,000 gold pieces out of him; and Vespasian replied, "Just put it down to 'passion for Vespasian'."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Expugnatus autem a quadam, quasi amore suo deperiret, cum perductae pro concubitu sestertia quadringenta donasset, admonente dispensatore, quem ad modum summam rationibus vellet inferri, "Vespasiano," inquit, "adamato".
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Vespasian, Ch. 22

„He answered some governors who had written to recommend an increase in the burden of provincial taxation, with: "A good shepherd shears his flock; he does not flay them."“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Praesidibus onerandas tributo provincias suadentibus rescripsit boni pastoris esse tondere pecus, non deglubere.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Tiberius, Ch. 32

„His wastefulness showed most of all in the architectural projects. He built a palace, stretching from the Palatine to the Esquiline, which he called…"The Golden House". The following details will give some notion of its size and magnificence. The entrance-hall was large enough to contain a huge statue of himself, 120 feet high…Parts of the house were overlaid with gold and studded with precious stones and mother-of pearl. All the dining-rooms had ceilings of fretted ivory, the panels of which could slide back and let a rain of flowers, or of perfume from hidden sprinklers, shower upon his guests. The main dining-room was circular, and its roof revolved, day and night, in time with the sky. Sea water, or sulphur water, was always on tap in the baths. When the palace had been decorated throughout in this lavish style, Nero dedicated it, and condescended to remark: "Good, now I can at last begin to live like a human being!"“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Non in alia re tamen damnosior quam in aedificando domum a Palatio Esquilias usque fecit, quam…Auream nominavit. De cuius spatio atque cultu suffecerit haec rettulisse. Vestibulum eius fuit, in quo colossus CXX pedum staret ipsius effigie…In ceteris partibus cuncta auro lita, distincta gemmis unionumque conchis erant; cenationes laqueatae tabulis eburneis versatilibus, ut flores, fistulatis, ut unguenta desuper spargerentur; praecipua cenationum rotunda, quae perpetuo diebus ac noctibus vice mundi circumageretur; balineae marinis et albulis fluentes aquis. Eius modi domum cum absolutam dedicaret, hactenus comprobavit, ut se diceret quasi hominem tandem habitare coepisse.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Nero, Ch. 31

„Twenty-three dagger thrusts went home as he stood there. Caesar did not utter a sound after Casca's blow had drawn a groan from him; though some say that when he saw Marcus Brutus about to deliver the second blow, he reproached him in Greek with: "You, too, my child?"“

—  Sueton, libro The Twelve Caesars

Originale: (la) Atque ita tribus et viginti plagis confossus est uno modo ad primum ictum gemitu sine voce edito, etsi tradiderunt quidam Marco Bruto irruenti dixisse: και συ τέκνον.
Origine: The Twelve Caesars, Julius Caesar, Ch. 82

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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