Frasi Richard Feynman

„Scienza è credere nell'ignoranza degli esperti.“

—  Richard Feynman, libro The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

The Pleasure of Finding Things Out : The Best Short Works of Richard Feynman, curato da Jeffery Robbins, ISBN 0-14-029034-6, alle pagine 186-187. Basato sulla trascrizione di un'intervista del 1981

„[I fisici] hanno cioè capito che il punto essenziale non è se una teoria piaccia o non piaccia, ma se fornisca previsioni in accordo con gli esperimenti. […] Dal punto di vista del buon senso l'elettrodinamica quantistica descrive una Natura assurda. Tuttavia è in perfetto accordo con i dati sperimentali. Mi auguro quindi che riusciate ad accettare la Natura per quello che è: assurda.“

—  Richard Feynman

This conference was worse than a Rorschach test: There's a meaningless inkblot, and the others ask you what you think you see, but when you tell them, they start arguing with you!
Origine: Da QED. La strana teoria della luce e della materia, traduzione di F. Nicodemi, Adelphi, 1989.

„Per una tecnologia che abbia successo, la realtà deve avere la precedenza sulle pubbliche relazioni, perché la natura non può essere imbrogliata.“

—  Richard Feynman

Origine: Dall' appendice F http://history.nasa.gov/rogersrep/v2appf.htm, che contiene alcune considerazioni di Feynman, del rapporto http://history.nasa.gov/rogersrep/genindex.htm della Commissione Rogers sul disastro dello Space Shuttle Challenger, giugno 1986.

„Penso di poter affermare che nessuno capisce la meccanica quantistica.“

—  Richard Feynman

citato in Tony Hey, Patrick Walters, "The New Quantum Universe", 2003

„It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.“

—  Richard Feynman

" New Textbooks for the "New" Mathematics http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/2362/1/feynman.pdf", Engineering and Science volume 28, number 6 (March 1965) p. 9-15 at p. 14
Paraphrased as "Precise language is not the problem. Clear language is the problem."
Contesto: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.Pure mathematics is just such an abstraction from the real world, and pure mathematics does have a special precise language for dealing with its own special and technical subjects. But this precise language is not precise in any sense if you deal with real objects of the world, and it is only pedantic and quite confusing to use it unless there are some special subtleties which have to be carefully distinguished.

„We are not to tell nature what she’s gotta be.“

—  Richard Feynman

Sir Douglas Robb Lectures, University of Auckland (1979); lecture 1, "Photons: Corpuscles of Light" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLQ2atfqk2c&t=48m01s
Contesto: We are not to tell nature what she’s gotta be. … She's always got better imagination than we have.

„I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.“

—  Richard Feynman, libro What Do You Care What Other People Think?

"The Making of a Scientist," p. 14 <!-- Feynman used variants of this bird story repeatedly: (1) "What is Science?", presented at the fifteenth annual meeting of the National Science Teachers Association, in New York City (1966) published in The Physics Teacher, volume 7, issue 6 (1969), p. 313-320. (2) Interview for the BBC TV Horizon program "The Pleasure of Finding Things Out" (1981), published in Christopher Sykes, No Ordinary Genius: The Illustrated Richard Feynman (1994), p. 27. -->
What Do You Care What Other People Think? (1988)
Contesto: You can know the name of that bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird. You'll only know about humans in different places, and what they call the bird. … I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.

„Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question — to doubt — to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained.“

—  Richard Feynman

The Value of Science (1955)
Contesto: The scientist has a lot of experience with ignorance and doubt and uncertainty, and this experience is of very great importance, I think. When a scientist doesn’t know the answer to a problem, he is ignorant. When he has a hunch as to what the result is, he is uncertain. And when he is pretty darn sure of what the result is going to be, he is still in some doubt. We have found it of paramount importance that in order to progress we must recognize our ignorance and leave room for doubt. Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty — some most unsure, some nearly sure, but none absolutely certain. Now, we scientists are used to this, and we take it for granted that it is perfectly consistent to be unsure, that it is possible to live and not know. But I don’t know whether everyone realizes this is true. Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question — to doubt — to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained.

„The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language.“

—  Richard Feynman

" New Textbooks for the "New" Mathematics http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/2362/1/feynman.pdf", Engineering and Science volume 28, number 6 (March 1965) p. 9-15 at p. 14
Paraphrased as "Precise language is not the problem. Clear language is the problem."
Contesto: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.Pure mathematics is just such an abstraction from the real world, and pure mathematics does have a special precise language for dealing with its own special and technical subjects. But this precise language is not precise in any sense if you deal with real objects of the world, and it is only pedantic and quite confusing to use it unless there are some special subtleties which have to be carefully distinguished.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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