Frasi di William Hazlitt

William Hazlitt photo
9   1

William Hazlitt

Data di nascita: 10. Aprile 1778
Data di morte: 18. Settembre 1830
Altri nomi: 威廉·赫茲利特

Pubblicità

William Hazlitt fu uno scrittore inglese, ricordato per la sua attività di saggista umanistico e di critico letterario, nonché come grammatico, filosofo e pittore.

È considerato uno dei sommi critici e saggisti in lingua inglese, assieme a Samuel Johnson e George Orwell. Tuttavia la sua opera è attualmente poco letta e per la maggior parte fuori stampa. Dandy irriverente e spassoso, nei suoi pamphlet al vetriolo se la prendeva spesso con gli intellettuali. Fu amico di molte persone che fanno ora parte del canone letterario del XIX secolo, tra le quali figurano Charles e Mary Lamb, Stendhal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge e William Wordsworth.

Autori simili

David Herbert Lawrence photo
David Herbert Lawrence36
scrittore, poeta e drammaturgo britannico
Hanif Kureishi photo
Hanif Kureishi18
drammaturgo e scrittore britannico
John Berger photo
John Berger11
critico d'arte, scrittore e pittore inglese
John Churton Collins photo
John Churton Collins2
docente, scrittore
Anthony Burgess photo
Anthony Burgess10
scrittore, critico letterario e glottoteta britannico
Francis Picabia photo
Francis Picabia6
pittore e scrittore francese
Walter Pater photo
Walter Pater6
saggista e critico letterario inglese
Paul Davies photo
Paul Davies2
fisico, saggista e divulgatore scientifico inglese
Henry Miller photo
Henry Miller74
scrittore, pittore e saggista statunitense

Frasi William Hazlitt

Pubblicità
Pubblicità

„There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

„There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

„A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

Pubblicità

„He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.

„Mankind are an incorrigible race.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: Mankind are an incorrigible race. Give them but bugbears and idols — it is all that they ask; the distinctions of right and wrong, of truth and falsehood, of good and evil, are worse than indifferent to them. "Common Places," No. 76, The Literary Examiner (September - December 1823)

Avanti
Anniversari di oggi
The Notorious B.I.G. photo
The Notorious B.I.G.8
rapper statunitense 1972 - 1997
Romain Gary photo
Romain Gary103
scrittore francese 1914 - 1980
Eric Hoffer28
scrittore e filosofo statunitense 1902 - 1983
Tommaso Campanella photo
Tommaso Campanella28
poeta, filosofo, teologo 1568 - 1639
Altri 62 anniversari oggi
Autori simili
David Herbert Lawrence photo
David Herbert Lawrence36
scrittore, poeta e drammaturgo britannico
Hanif Kureishi photo
Hanif Kureishi18
drammaturgo e scrittore britannico
John Berger photo
John Berger11
critico d'arte, scrittore e pittore inglese
John Churton Collins photo
John Churton Collins2
docente, scrittore
Anthony Burgess photo
Anthony Burgess10
scrittore, critico letterario e glottoteta britannico