Frasi di William Hazlitt

William Hazlitt photo
12   2

William Hazlitt

Data di nascita: 10. Aprile 1778
Data di morte: 18. Settembre 1830
Altri nomi: 威廉·赫茲利特

William Hazlitt fu uno scrittore inglese, ricordato per la sua attività di saggista umanistico e di critico letterario, nonché come grammatico, filosofo e pittore.

È considerato uno dei sommi critici e saggisti in lingua inglese, assieme a Samuel Johnson e George Orwell. Tuttavia la sua opera è attualmente poco letta e per la maggior parte fuori stampa. Dandy irriverente e spassoso, nei suoi pamphlet al vetriolo se la prendeva spesso con gli intellettuali. Fu amico di molte persone che fanno ora parte del canone letterario del XIX secolo, tra le quali figurano Charles e Mary Lamb, Stendhal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge e William Wordsworth e John Keats.

Frasi William Hazlitt

„La moda è la raffinatezza che corre davanti alla volgarità e teme di essere sorpassata.“

—  William Hazlitt
Source: Da Conversations of James Northcole, 1830; citato in Dizionario delle citazioni.

„È impossibile odiare qualcuno che conosciamo.“

—  William Hazlitt
Table Talk: Essays On Men And Manners, "On Criticism" Source: Citato in Dizionario delle citazioni, a cura di Italo Sordi, BUR, 1992. ISBN 14603-X

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them.“

—  William Hazlitt, libro The Round Table
The Round Table (1815-1817), Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

„He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.“

—  William Hazlitt
Lectures on the English Poets http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16209/16209.txt (1818), Lecture I, "On Poetry in General", Context: Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.

„There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong.“

—  William Hazlitt, libro The Round Table
The Round Table (1815-1817), Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

„There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind.“

—  William Hazlitt, libro The Round Table
The Round Table (1815-1817), Context: There is a natural tendency in sects to narrow the mind. The extreme stress laid upon difierences of minor importance, to the neglect of more general truths and broader views of things, gives an inverted bias to the understanding; and this bias is continually increased by the eagerness of controversy, and captious hostility to the prevailing system. A party-feeling of this kind once formed will insensibly communicate itself to other topics; and will be too apt to lead its votaries to a contempt for the opinions of others, a jealousy of every difference of sentiment, and a disposition to arrogate all sound principle as well as understanding to themselves, and those who think with them. We can readily conceive how such persons, from fixing too high a value on the practical pledge which they have given of the independence and sincerity of their opinions, come at last to entertain a suspicion of every one else as acting under the shackles of prejudice or the mask of hypocrisy. All those who have not given in their unqualified protest against received doctrines and established authority, are supposed to labour under an acknowledged incapacity to form a rational determination on any subject whatever. Any argument, not having the presumption of singularity in its favour, is immediately set aside as nugatory. There is, however, no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice. For this last implies not only the practical conviction that it is right, but the theoretical assumption that it cannot be wrong. From considering all objections as in this manner "null and void,” the mind becomes so thoroughly satisfied with its own conclusions, as to render any farther examination of them superfluous, and confounds its exclusive pretensions to reason with the absolute possession of it. "On the Tendency of Sects"

„Mankind are an incorrigible race.“

—  William Hazlitt
Context: Mankind are an incorrigible race. Give them but bugbears and idols — it is all that they ask; the distinctions of right and wrong, of truth and falsehood, of good and evil, are worse than indifferent to them. "Common Places," No. 76, The Literary Examiner (September - December 1823)

„The only vice which cannot be forgiven is hypocrisy. The repentance of a hypocrite is itself hypocrisy.“

—  William Hazlitt, Selected Essays, 1778-1830
Characteristics, in the manner of Rochefoucauld's Maxims (1823), No. 257

„He will never have true friends who is afraid of making enemies.“

—  William Hazlitt, Selected Essays, 1778-1830
Characteristics, in the manner of Rochefoucauld's Maxims (1823), No. 401

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Autori simili

John Ruskin photo
John Ruskin14
scrittore, pittore e poeta britannico
Léon Bloy photo
Léon Bloy27
scrittore, saggista e poeta francese
William Blake photo
William Blake64
poeta, incisore e pittore inglese
Mary Shelley photo
Mary Shelley23
scrittrice, saggista e biografa inglese
Emily Brontë photo
Emily Brontë36
scrittrice e poetessa inglese
Emile Zola photo
Emile Zola29
giornalista e scrittore francese
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson108
filosofo, scrittore e saggista statunitense
Claude Monet photo
Claude Monet8
pittore francese
George Gordon Byron photo
George Gordon Byron40
poeta e politico inglese
Guy de Maupassant photo
Guy de Maupassant40
scrittore e drammaturgo francese
Anniversari di oggi
Fabrizio Moro photo
Fabrizio Moro46
cantautore e chitarrista italiano 1975
Charles Baudelaire photo
Charles Baudelaire140
poeta francese 1821 - 1867
Dietrich Bonhoeffer photo
Dietrich Bonhoeffer25
teologo tedesco 1906 - 1945
Francois Rabelais photo
Francois Rabelais17
scrittore e umanista francese 1494 - 1553
Altri 84 anniversari oggi
Autori simili
John Ruskin photo
John Ruskin14
scrittore, pittore e poeta britannico
Léon Bloy photo
Léon Bloy27
scrittore, saggista e poeta francese
William Blake photo
William Blake64
poeta, incisore e pittore inglese
Mary Shelley photo
Mary Shelley23
scrittrice, saggista e biografa inglese
Emily Brontë photo
Emily Brontë36
scrittrice e poetessa inglese
x