Frasi H. G. Wells

„For neither do men live nor die in vain.“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The War of the Worlds

Book II, Ch. 8 (Ch. 25 in editions without Book divisions): Dead London
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Contesto: For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things — taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many — those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance — our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

„Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.“

—  H. G. Wells

Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought http://books.google.com/books?id=OTP8dQHO57UC (1901), The Faith, Morals, and Public Policy of The New Republic, pp. 340–343
Contesto: Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.
And how will the new republic treat the inferior races? How will it deal with the black? how will it deal with the yellow man? how will it tackle that alleged termite in the civilized woodwork, the Jew? Certainly not as races at all. It will aim to establish, and it will at last, though probably only after a second century has passed, establish a world state with a common language and a common rule. All over the world its roads, its standards, its laws, and its apparatus of control will run. It will, I have said, make the multiplication of those who fall behind a certain standard of social efficiency unpleasant and difficult… The Jew will probably lose much of his particularism, intermarry with Gentiles, and cease to be a physically distinct element in human affairs in a century or so. But much of his moral tradition will, I hope, never die. … And for the rest, those swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people, who do not come into the new needs of efficiency?
Well, the world is a world, not a charitable institution, and I take it they will have to go. The whole tenor and meaning of the world, as I see it, is that they have to go. So far as they fail to develop sane, vigorous, and distinctive personalities for the great world of the future, it is their portion to die out and disappear.
The world has a greater purpose than happiness; our lives are to serve God's purpose, and that purpose aims not at man as an end, but works through him to greater issues.

„More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish.“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The Outline of History

Ch. 36
The Outline of History (1920)
Contesto: From 1789 to late in 1791 the French Revolution was an orderly process, and from the summer of 1794 the Republic was an orderly and victorious state. The Terror was not the work of the whole country, but of the town mob which owed its existence and its savagery to the misrule, and social injustice of the ancient regime... More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish.

„By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The War of the Worlds

Book II, Ch. 8 (Ch. 25 in editions without Book divisions): Dead London
The War of the Worlds (1898)
Contesto: For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things — taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many — those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance — our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

„Ashoka (264 to 227 B.C.), one of the great monarchs of history, whose dominions extended from Afghanistan to Madras… is the only military monarch on record who abandoned warfare] after [[victory.“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The Outline of History

chapter no. 25.4 (Buddhism and Ashoka) page no 365-366
The Outline of History (1920)
Contesto: Ashoka (264 to 227 B. C.), one of the great monarchs of history, whose dominions extended from Afghanistan to Madras... is the only military monarch on record who abandoned warfare] after [[victory. He had invaded Kalinga (255 B. C.), a country along the east coast of Madras, perhaps with some intention of completing the conquest of the tip of the Indian peninsula. The expedition was successful, but he was disgusted by what be saw of the cruelties and horrors of war. He declared, in certain inscriptions that still exist, that he would no longer seek conquest by war, but by religion, and the rest of his life was devoted to the spreading of Buddhism throughout the world. He seems to have ruled his vast empire in peace and with great ability. He was no mere religious fanatic. For eight and twenty years Asoka worked sanely for the real needs of men. Amidst the tens of thousands of names of monarchs that crowd the columns of history, their majesties and graciousnesses and serenities and royal highnesses and the like, the name of Asoka shines, and shines, almost alone, a star. From the Volga to Japan his name is still honoured. China, Tibet, and even India, though it has left his doctrine, preserve the tradition of his greatness. More living men cherish his memory to-day than have ever heard the names of Constantine or Charlemagne.

„An animal may be ferocious and cunning enough, but it takes a real man to tell a lie.“

—  H. G. Wells, libro The Island of Doctor Moreau

Ch. 21: The Reversion of the Beast Folk
The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Autori simili

William Somerset Maugham photo
William Somerset Maugham77
scrittore e commediografo britannico
Aldous Huxley photo
Aldous Huxley152
scrittore britannico
Rudyard Kipling photo
Rudyard Kipling64
scrittore e poeta britannico
Jerome Klapka Jerome photo
Jerome Klapka Jerome69
scrittore e giornalista britannico
Archibald Joseph Cronin photo
Archibald Joseph Cronin33
scrittore britannico
William Golding photo
William Golding14
scrittore britannico
Douglas Adams photo
Douglas Adams99
scrittore inglese
Peter Ustinov photo
Peter Ustinov19
attore britannico
Alan Alexander Milne photo
Alan Alexander Milne4
scrittore britannico
George Orwell photo
George Orwell168
scrittore britannico
Anniversari di oggi
Pif photo
Pif27
conduttore televisivo e scrittore italiano 1972
Robert Fulghum photo
Robert Fulghum11
scrittore 1937
Giacomo Casanova photo
Giacomo Casanova70
avventuriero, scrittore, diplomatico, agente segreto italia… 1725 - 1798
Massimo Troisi photo
Massimo Troisi14
attore e regista italiano 1953 - 1994
Altri 66 anniversari oggi
Autori simili
William Somerset Maugham photo
William Somerset Maugham77
scrittore e commediografo britannico
Aldous Huxley photo
Aldous Huxley152
scrittore britannico
Rudyard Kipling photo
Rudyard Kipling64
scrittore e poeta britannico
Jerome Klapka Jerome photo
Jerome Klapka Jerome69
scrittore e giornalista britannico
Archibald Joseph Cronin photo
Archibald Joseph Cronin33
scrittore britannico
x